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24 Incredible Camera Trap Images Of Animals: What They Get Up To When No-one’s Around

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July 9th, 2014Conservation, Wildlife
By Jemma Dicks


Camera trap images of animals

Camera trap images of animals are increasingly being used to raise conservation awareness. The cameras are hidden in areas of interest and activated by motion sensors, infra-red sensors, or light beams.

They provide information on what species are common in the area and act as a basis for further study. All of this is achieved whilst causing minimal disturbance to the wildlife. They are also important in detecting endangered and rarely seen species as well as documenting the results of habitat destruction on species populations.

Whilst looking through camera trap images of animals taken on conservation volunteering projects in Kenya, Botswana and Peru, I found some real gems. Some of the images are amusing, others have captured rare or elusive animals. All show incredible scenes that you would never get to see up close or in person.

1. Baboon in Botswana

Baboon in Botswana

Did you know? Baboons lack prehensile tails and therefore spend the majority of their time on the ground.

2. Hippopotamus in Kenya

Hippo in Kenya

Did you know? Hippos secrete a red, oily substance which acts as a sunblock and skin moistener.

3. Impala in Botswana

Impala in Botswana

Did you know? When running, impala can leap over 30 feet ahead.

4. Male jaguar on the prowl in the Peruvian Amazon

Jaguar in Peru

Did you know? Jaguars catch their prey by the head.

5. Brown hyena in Botswana

Brown hyena in Botswana

Did you know? Unlike the spotted hyena, the brown hyena does not laugh.

6. Warthog in Kenya

Warthog in Kenya

Did you know? You can determine the gender of a warthog by the protrusions (or “warts”) on its face. Males have two pairs whilst females just have the one pair.

7. Large spotted genet in Botswana

Large spotted genet in Botswana

Did you know? Large spotted genets are often kept as pets. The trade in exotic pets is one of the major contributors for loss of biodiversity.

8. Two-toed sloth with baby in the Peruvian Amazon

Sloth in Peru

Did you know? Sloths defecate and urinate only around once a week due to their slow metabolism.

9. Kudu in Botswana

Kudu in Botswana

Did you know? Male kudus often use their horns to fight each other. Occasionally the twisted horns become entwined and the animals are unable to disentangle themselves leading to death by starvation or predation.

10. Two young male impala fighting for females and territory in Kenya

Impala in Kenya

Did you know? Female impalas can delay giving birth by up to a month if weather conditions are unfavourable.

11. Tree squirrel in Botswana

Tree squirrel in Botswana

Did you know? There have been squirrels on the African continent for over 20 million years.

12. Leopard in Kenya

Leopard in Kenya

Did you know? Leopards do not need to drink much water – they are able to live off the moisture in their prey.

13. Honey badger in Botswana

Honey badger in Botswana

Did you know? Honey badgers are among the most fearless creatures in the world and have been known to chase and steal the food of lions and hyenas.

14. Aardvark in Kenya

Aardvark in Kenya

Did you know? The elephant is one of the aardvark’s closest living relatives.

15. Ocelot in the Peruvian Amazon

Ocelot in Peru

Did you know? The ocelot has pointed teeth for biting, blade-like teeth for tearing, but no teeth for chewing. It swallows its food in chunks.

16. Elephants in Botswana

Elephants in Botswana

Did you know? Elephants could become extinct within the next 50 years if poaching is not controlled.

17. Black-backed jackal stalking a warthog and her baby in Kenya

Jackal in Kenya

Did you know? Jackals mate for life

18. Impala in Botswana

Impala in Botswana

Did you know? The impala in the forefront of this image is an albino. This is caused by a reduction in skin pigmentation and is incredibly rare to see in the wild.

19. Puma in the Peruvian Amazon

Puma in Peru

Did you know? Pumas are born with spots and blue eyes, which they keep until aged around 6 months.

20. African civet in Botswana

African civet in Botswana

Did you know? The African civet regularly eats poisonous millipedes that release cyanide when exposed to digestive juices. The civet counteracts this by eating the fruit of certain trees which neutralises its stomach acid.

21. Vervet monkey in Botswana

Vervet monkey in Botswana

Did you know? Vervet monkeys have evolved unique alarm calls for when predators are nearby. Young vervets often sound these alarms for fun and wait to watch the reaction of the adults.

22. Spotted hyena in Kenya

Hyena in Kenya

Did you know? Female spotted hyenas have three times more testosterone than males.

23. Cape clawless otter in Botswana

Cape clawless otter in Botswana title=

Did you know? This is the second largest type of freshwater otter. As the name would suggest, its paws are clawless and only partially webbed.

24. Buffalo in Kenya

Buffalo in Kenya

Did you know? Buffalo will mob predators, particularly when trying to protect a calf.

Which of these photos is your favourite and why? Let us know below!

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